Googles John Mueller was asked if it is assists after doing a huge URL migration to keep the old XML Sitemap file up for a bit. John stated “the impact would be very little” by utilizing this strategy.The theory is that if you leave the old XML sitemap live for a bit, Google will aim to it to crawl those URLs much faster and after that detect the brand-new URLs (the ones the old ones reroute to) quicker. However John stated it does not actually work that way, he stated “if you change all the dates on existing pages, that doesnt provide us much insight into where to start crawling, so I suspect overall it would crawl as normal.” So normal crawling will be done on those old URLs and Google will select up on the redirects in its normal crawl – the XML sitemap might not have an effect on that, at least a noticeable impact.Here are those tweets:@JohnMu Do you suggest keeping the old xml sitemap live after a large URL structure migration, so that bots still have access to them and find the new URLs quicker by means of redirects?– Daniel Lira (@DanielTexasLira) November 16, 2021 Temporarily is fine, however I presume the result would be very little (if you change all the dates on existing pages, that doesnt give us much insight into where to start crawling, so I suspect general it would crawl as typical)– & #x 1f9c0; John & #x 1f9c0; (@JohnMu) November 17, 2021 It is an excellent question due to the fact that Google, including John Mueller, has actually stated in the past that you can utilize Sitemaps to speed up page removals on some level and it seems Gary Illyes from Google stated this may likewise deal with URL migrations. So the question has rational sense however the action likewise does.Forum discussion at Twitter.

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