Rather, CMOs need to begin with a tactical vision: What should my customer journey look like? In one lane is the user experience– what the customer is in fact doing (e.g., visiting your website, finishing a form to get more information, placing an order). The 3rd lane is first-party information– what the consumer is informing you at each action in the journey, consisting of insights to their special difficulties, preferences or goals, as well as details around demographics and way of life. The last lane is innovation– the tools enabling UX, delivering messaging and recording customer data. Its much simpler to talk about the huge, hot consumer data platform than to acknowledge the simpler things youre not doing well today.

Heres how CMOs can reconsider their method and get traction toward a customer-centric change by being both more strategic and more tactical.
You wont get there if you do not know where you desire to go
The deprecation of cookies has CMOs rushing to discover tech-driven solutions to the first-party information obstacle. While tech certainly plays a key role in marketing improvement, it isnt the starting point.
Instead, CMOs require to start with a tactical vision: What should my consumer journey appear like? To answer this question effectively, you need to think empathetically. Draw up the current consumer journey and consider all the barriers, sources of friction and pain points.
Its helpful to believe in terms of “swim lanes” in the consumer journey. In one lane is the user experience– what the client is really doing (e.g., visiting your website, finishing a type to get more details, positioning an order). In another lane is your messaging– what youre interacting to the consumer at each action, in what method, and how that messaging naturally leads them to the next step.
The third lane is first-party information– what the client is informing you at each step in the journey, consisting of insights to their special challenges, goals or preferences, as well as details around demographics and lifestyle. (Are they single or married?
The last lane is innovation– the tools making it possible for UX, providing messaging and capturing customer information. Marketing leaders dont have to enter the technical weeds here, but they should be asking the ideal questions (e.g., “Do these tools talk with each other?”). The responses they get need to make good sense.
Focus on the fundamentals: crawl, walk, run.
Once its time to get tactical, where do you start?
Business make the error of trying to change all at as soon as, jumping right to a major task with a glossy goal in mind, like developing their own client information platform. However in our change projects with online marketers, we often find theyre missing out on basic opportunities.
Their programmatic marketing isnt enhanced. Typically, they have several platforms bidding on the exact same audience. Its much simpler to talk about the big, hot customer information platform than to acknowledge the easier things youre not doing well today.
Shoring up the basics develops a foundation of data clarity and data health– which guarantees you dont end up putting bad gas into your consumer information platform (or your Ferrari). A lot more notably, these fast wins offer you momentum and buy-in to power the bigger actions in your marketing change.
A real-world example of tactical thinking and an easy start.
With DELVE, Gerber Life Insurance Company (GLIC) recently caught and integrated more than 3 billion first-party data records into a cloud-based information lake in Google Cloud Platform– all in less than 12 months. Thats the type of huge, shiny task that marketing leaders want to attain– and it won AdExchangers Best First-Party Data Strategy Award for 2021.
GLIC had been slowly building up to this job for years. They started by believing tactically about the experience they desired to develop for customers. Then they got tactical, concentrating on the principles, fast wins and developing momentum.
Its not ground-breaking, however its an easy, repeatable formula for driving meaningful modification and producing real market advantage with your first-party data

By Greg Sobiech, CEO & & Founder, DELVE
When first-party information became the center of every marketing conversation, every CMO I speak with started asking the exact same questions: How do I achieve return on marketing financial investment in a cookieless world? How do I browse progressing information governance and privacy issues and fulfill client expectations for hyper-personalized experiences?
The drumbeat from the market calls for big, vibrant modification– “First-party data-driven marketing transformation– now!” This dominating narrative has too lots of marketing leaders starting from a reactive, shortage state of mind, trying to run before their marketing programs have started to crawl.

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